Stat-urday, 7/20/2019: Gaylord Perry’s “Moon Shot”


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Gaylord Perry with the Tacoma Giants in 1961 (photo courtesy of Wikipedia)

On July 20, 1969, pitcher Gaylord Perry hit is his first major league home run. In his 22-year career Perry would amass a batting average of .131 with 141 hits, including 17 doubles, 6 home runs, and 47 RBI. As a Hall of Fame pitcher, however, he’d finish his career with a 3.11 ERA, allowing 399 home runs with a win-loss percentage of .542.

One of the myth’s surrounding Perry is the tale that his manager with the Giants once said, “a man will land on the moon before Gaylord Perry hits a home run.” According to MLB.com’s Cut 4, the story goes as follows:

One day during the ’64 season, [San Francisco Giants Manager Alvin] Dark and San Francisco Examiner reporter Harry Jupiter looked on as Perry smacked some home runs during batting practice. Jupiter told Dark that Perry looked pretty good with a bat in his hands and remarked that the pitcher might even hit a home run one of these days. Dark’s response set in motion one of the weirdest coincidences in baseball history: “Mark my words,” he said, “a man will land on the moon before Gaylord Perry hits a home run.”

And if you don’t believe that, here’s Perry telling the story himself:

 

Happy Stat-urday! Happy Moon Landing Day!

~ baseballrebecca

 

 

 

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Stat-urday, 7/13/2019


1280px-An_Oakland_A's_Pitcher_Delivers_During_A_Game_With_The_Home_Team_Chicago_Cubs_At_Wrigley_Field,_07-1973_(8674830191)

Vida Blue pitching for the Oakland A’s, July 1973 (photo courtesy of the National Archives via Wikipedia)

Next Saturday marks a big anniversary. Well, make that two – because July 20th is the 50th anniversary of Vida Blue’s Major League debut, when he pitched 5 1/3 innings for the Oakland A’s giving up 6 hits and 5 runs (3 earned). The following day, the New York Times barely mentioned Blue’s inauspicious first outing in its summary of the Angels and A’s doubleheader: “In the first game Aurelio Rodriguez and Jim Spencer greeted the major league debut of southpaw picture, Vida Blue, with Homers.” [“A’s Top Angels, 9-6 after 7-3 Defeat: Jackson Clouts 37th Homer – Bando Also Connects,” The New York Times, July 21, 1969, p. 44]

Of course, the less than memorable event may have been overshadowed by news of the Apollo 11 moon landing on the same day, which got more space in the sport section than did Blue:

Baseball paid tribute to America’s astronauts yesterday by halting play at three ball parks when the lunar module, Eagle, touched down on the moon. In Philadelphia, the second game of a double-header between the Phillies and the Chicago Cubs was stopped for five minutes in the third inning and players from both teams lined up along the foul lines. There was a moment of silent prayer for continued success of the mission and a recording was played of Kate Smith singing “God Bless America.” The lunar landing was also observed at Montreal’s Jarry Park, where the Expos played the New York Mets, and at Atlanta Stadium, where the Braves played the San Diego Padres.” [“Three Baseball Parks Salute the Touchdown,” New York Times, July 21, 1960, p. 43.]

According to the Society of American Baseball Research, Blue started three more games for the A’s in 1969 and then spent the rest of the season in the bullpen. The following season he started for the triple-Iowa Oaks before being called up to the A’s in September. Blue would go on to pitch in the majors for an additional 15 years until his retirement in 1986. Over his MLB career, he pitched in 502 games, starting 473 times. He won 209 games, lost 161, and saved 2. His career ERA was 3.27.

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

 

 

 

Stat-urday, 7/6/2019


There was an amazing game with some amazing stats on Wednesday from just one game in the Dominican Summer League:

  • 40 runs,
  • 36 hits,
  • 5 home runs,
  • 6 errors,
  • 3 stolen bases,
  • 5 wild pitches,
  • 2 balks,
  • 33 players used, and
  • 215 pitches thrown.
  • All in 3hours and 42 minutes!

Check out the details on MiLB.com!

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

Stat-urday, 6/29/2019


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Scooter Gennett with the Cincinnati Reds in 2017 (photo courtesy of Wikipedia)

I stumbled upon some interesting stats on Baseball-Reference.com: Players’ average age, by league. They’ve calculated the leagues’ average player age, weighted by number of at-bats and games played. At first I was surprised to see that the league with the highest average batters’ average age is the Class A-Advanced Florida State League, with an average batters’ age of 31.1. Upon further research however, its rehabbing Major Leaguers that  driving up that average age, such as: Scooter Gennett, age 29, with the Daytona Tortugas; Josh Harrison, 31, and Jordy Mercer, 32, with the Lakeland Flying Tigers; Nelson Cruz, 38, with the Fort Myers Miracle; and a bunch of rehabbing Yankees with the Tampa Tarpons. Check out the stats below.

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

 

Major League Baseball and Minor League Baseball
League Level Teams Batters’ Avg. Age Batting Average
American League Major League 15 28.0 0.251
National League Major League 15 28.4 0.250
International League AAA 14 27.1 0.265
Mexican League AAA 16 29.5 0.304
Pacific Coast League AAA 16 26.3 0.273
Eastern League AA 12 24.2 0.237
Southern League AA 10 23.7 0.241
Texas League AA 8 29.2 0.254
California League Adv A 8 22.5 0.245
Carolina League Adv A 10 22.6 0.244
Florida State League Adv A 12 31.1 0.241
Midwest League A 16 21.2 0.239
South Atlantic League A 14 21.5 0.238
New York-Pennsylvania League Short-Season A 14 20.9 0.224
Northwest League Short-Season A 8 20.8 0.228
Appalachian League Rookie 10 20.4 0.238
Arizona League Rookie 21 19.6 0.269
Gulf Coast League Rookie 18 19.4 0.237
Pioneer League Rookie 8 20.5 0.255
Japanese and Korean Leagues
League Level Teams Batters’ Avg. Age BA
Japan Central League Foreign 6 28.6 0.250
Japan Eastern League Foreign 7 24.3
Japan Pacific League Foreign 6 28.0 0.250
Japan Western League Foreign 5 24.6
Korean Baseball Organization Foreign 10 29.0 0.268
Independent Leagues
League Level Teams Batters’ Avg. Age BA
American Association Independent 12 26.7 0.262
Atlantic League Independent 8 29.6 0.262
Canadian-American Association Independent 9 26.1 0.266
Frontier League Independent 10 24.2 0.244

Stat-urday, 6/22/2019


Corey Paul turned 50 yesterday. Who’s that, you ask? Corey Paul was drafted by the Seattle Mariners in the 16th round of the 1987 MLB amateur draft. He spent the 1987 season in Northwest League playing for the Bellingham Mariners. In 33 games, he had only 13 hits and 7 RBI, with a batting average of .137. Paul took the next year off, but returned to Bellingham in 1989. That year he improved his batting average to .237, hitting 3 home runs and 25 RBI in 59 games. In 1990, he was promoted to the high-A Salinas Spurs in the California League, where he batted .226 in 80 games with 28 RBI and 4 home runs.

Although Paul did not return to the Mariners’ system after the 1990 season, he did resurface a few years later in the independent Western League, playing for teams in California and Washington between 1995 and 1998. In 1999, Paul started the season in Taiwan before moving to Tokorozawa, Japan, to play for the Seibu Lions of the Japan Pacific League. He then spent the 2002 season in Korea with the Hyundai Unicorns. Paul returned to North America in 2003, playing for first for Saltillo, then for Tabasco. He also played winter ball for the Algonoderos de Guasave in the Mexican Pacific League and the Oriente Caribbeans in the Venezuela Winter League. In 2004, Paul was again the United States, playing in the independent Northern League with Fargo-Moorhead and Joliet. He played for Calgary in the same league in 2005. Check out his stats below.

During his professional baseball career, Paul played for teams in Mexico, Venezuela, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, Canada, and the United States. I wonder what the stats are for the most countries a player has played in?

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

Year Team League G H HR RBI BA OBP
1987 Bellingham Mariners Northwest League 33 13 0 7 0.137 0.281
1989 Bellingham Mariners Northwest League 59 47 3 25 0.237 0.367
1990 Salinas Spurs California League 89 52 4 28 0.226 0.35
1995 Grays Harbor Gulls Western League 74 76 9 36 0.297 0.399
1996 Tri-City Posse Western League 81 87 5 43 0.326 0.395
1997 Chico Heat Western League 53 64 6 41 0.348 0.496
1998 Tri-City Posse Western League 88 90 13 58 0.296 0.433
1999 Taipei Suns Taiwan Major League 39 0.360
1999 Seibu Lions Japan Pacific League 59 47 12 29 0.257 0.318
2000 Seibu Lions Japan Pacific League 47 30 4 18 0.242 0.333
2002 Hyundai Unicorns Korean Baseball Organization 113 111 18 64 0.28 0.345
2003 Saltillo Saraperos Mexican League 66 83 9 45 0.356 0.446
2003 Tabasco Olmecas Mexican League 28 25 2 8 0.258 0.405
2004 Fargo-Moorhead Redhawks Northern League 11 9 1 7 0.25 0.372
2004 Joliet Jackhammers Northern League 84 92 10 45 0.298 0.407
2005 Calgary Vipers Northern League 29 27 3 15 0.265 0.394
Career Totals: 914 853 99 469 0.283 0.389

Stat-urday, 6/15/2019: College World Series


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TD Ameritrade Park, Omaha, NE, home of the College World Series (photo courtesy of Wikipedia)

The 2019 College World Series begins today with Game 1 starting at 2 p.m. (Eastern). The following eight teams are this year’s participants:

  • Arkansas (46-18)
  • Auburn (38-26)
  • Florida State (41-21)
  • Louisville (49-16)
  • Michigan (46-20)
  • Mississippi State (51-13)
  • Texas Tech (44-18)
  • Vanderbilt (54-11)

Check out the stats below on the CWS over the years, and see more stats on NCAA.com.

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

Year Champion Score Runner-Up Most Outstanding Player
1947 California 17–8, 8–7 Yale  
1948 Southern California 3–1, 3–8, 9–2 Yale  
1949 Texas 10–3 Wake Forest Tom Hamilton, Texas
1950 Texas 3–0 Washington State Ray VanCleef, Rutgers
1951 Oklahoma 3–2 Tennessee Sidney Hatfield, Tennessee
1952 Holy Cross 8–4 Missouri James O’Neill, Holy Cross
1953 Michigan 7–5 Texas J.L. Smith, Texas
1954 Missouri 4–1 Rollins Tom Yewcic, Michigan State
1955 Wake Forest 7–6 Western Michigan Tom Borland, Oklahoma A&M
1956 Minnesota 12–1 Arizona Jerry Thomas, Minnesota
1957 California 1–0 Penn State Cal Emery, Penn State
1958 Southern California 8–7 Missouri Bill Thom, Southern California
1959 Oklahoma State 5–3 Arizona Jim Dobson, Oklahoma State
1960 Minnesota 2–1 Southern California John Erickson, Minnesota
1961 Southern California 1–0 Oklahoma State Littleton Fowler, Oklahoma State
1962 Michigan 5–4 Santa Clara Bob Garibaldi, Santa Clara
1963 Southern California 5–2 Arizona Bud Hollowell, Southern California
1964 Minnesota 5–1 Missouri Joe Ferris, Maine
1965 Arizona State 2–1 Ohio State Sal Bando, Arizona State
1966 Ohio State 8–2 Oklahoma State Steve Arlin, Ohio State
1967 Arizona State 11–2 Houston Ron Davini, Arizona State
1968 Southern California 4–3 Southern Illinois Bill Seinsoth, Southern California
1969 Arizona State 10–1 Tulsa John Dolinsek, Arizona State
1970 Southern California 2–1 Florida State Gene Ammann, Florida State
1971 Southern California 7–2 Southern Illinois Jerry Tabb, Tulsa
1972 Southern California 1–0 Arizona State Russ McQueen, Southern California
1973 Southern California 4–3 Arizona State Dave Winfield, Minnesota
1974 Southern California 7–3 Miami (FL) George Milke, Southern California
1975 Texas 5–1 South Carolina Mickey Reichenbach, Texas
1976 Arizona 7–1 Eastern Michigan Steve Powers, Arizona
1977 Arizona State 2–1 South Carolina Bob Horner, Arizona State
1978 Southern California 10–3 Arizona State Rod Boxberger, Southern California
1979 Cal State Fullerton 2–1 Arkansas Tony Hudson, Cal State Fullerton
1980 Arizona 5–3 Hawaii Terry Francona, Arizona
1981 Arizona State 7–4 Oklahoma State Stan Holmes, Arizona State
1982 Miami (FL) 9–3 Wichita State Dan Smith, Miami (FL)
1983 Texas 4–3 Alabama Calvin Schiraldi, Texas
1984 Cal State Fullerton 3–1 Texas John Fishel, Cal State Fullerton
1985 Miami (FL) 10–6 Texas Greg Ellena, Miami (FL)
1986 Arizona 10–2 Florida State Mike Senne, Arizona
1987 Stanford 9–5 Oklahoma State Paul Carey, Stanford
1988 Stanford 9–4 Arizona State Lee Plemel, Stanford
1989 Wichita State 5–3 Texas Greg Brummett, Wichita State
1990 Georgia 2–1 Oklahoma State Mike Rebhan, Georgia
1991 LSU 6–3 Wichita State Gary Hymel, LSU
1992 Pepperdine 3–2 Cal State Fullerton Phil Nevin, Cal State Fullerton
1993 LSU 8–0 Wichita State Todd Walker, LSU
1994 Oklahoma 13–5 Georgia Tech Chip Glass, Oklahoma
1995 Cal State Fullerton 11–5 Southern California Mark Kotsay, Cal State Fullerton
1996 LSU 9–8 Miami (FL) Pat Burrell, Miami (FL)
1997 LSU 13–6 Alabama Brandon Larson, LSU
1998 Southern California 21–14 Arizona State Wes Rachels, Southern California
1999 Miami (FL) 6–5 Florida State Marshall McDougall, Florida State
2000 LSU 6–5 Stanford Trey Hodges, LSU
2001 Miami (FL) 12–1 Stanford Charlton Jimerson, Miami (FL)
2002 Texas 12–6 South Carolina Huston Street, Texas
2003 Rice 4–310, 3–8, 14–2 Stanford John Hudgins, Stanford
2004 Cal State Fullerton 6–4, 3–2 Texas Jason Windsor, Cal State Fullerton
2005 Texas 4–2, 6–2 Florida David Maroul, Texas
2006 Oregon State 3–4, 11–7, 3–2 North Carolina Jonah Nickerson, Oregon State
2007 Oregon State 11–4, 9–3 North Carolina Jorge Luis Reyes, Oregon State
2008 Fresno State 6–7, 19–10, 6–1 Georgia Tommy Mendonca, Fresno State
2009 LSU 7–6, 1–5, 11–4 Texas Jared Mitchell, LSU
2010 South Carolina 7–1, 2–111 UCLA Jackie Bradley, Jr., South Carolina
2011 South Carolina 2–111, 5–2 Florida Scott Wingo, South Carolina
2012 Arizona 5–1, 4–1 South Carolina Rob Refsnyder, Arizona
2013 UCLA 3–1, 8–0 Mississippi State Adam Plutko, UCLA
2014 Vanderbilt 9–8, 2–7, 3–2 Virginia Dansby Swanson, Vanderbilt
2015 Virginia 1–5, 3–0, 4–2 Vanderbilt Josh Sborz, Virginia
2016 Coastal Carolina 0–3, 5–4, 4–3 Arizona Andrew Beckwith, Coastal Carolina
2017 Florida 4–3, 6–1 LSU Alex Faedo, Florida
2018 Oregon State 1–4, 5–3, 5–0 Arkansas Adley Rutschman, Oregon State

 

 

 

 

Stat-urday, 6/8/2019


In my continuing annoyance with the Baltimore Orioles this season, I am keeping track of all of my favorite former Orioles (and a few others) to see how they’re doing on other and better teams. As expected, Adam Jones and Nick Markakis are still awesome!

Here are the latest stats:

Former Oriole Games AB Avg OBP RBI HR
Adam Jones 59 228 .276 .321 37 12
Christian Walker 58 213 .258 .328 24 11
Tim Beckham 53 187 .241 .290 33 11
Nick Markakis 60 207 .271 .362 28 4
Manny Machado 60 219 .247 .337 31 10
Jonathan Schoop 53 195 .262 .318 31 11
Caleb Joseph* 9 17 .176 .176 2 0
Nelson Cruz 37 134 .261 .342 23 8
2019 Orioles 62 2120 .239 .300 238 79

* Optioned to the Reno Aces on 5/2/2019

 

Former Oriole Games IP W L SV ERA
Kevin Gausman 12 60.0 2 5 0 6.15
Zack Britton 28 27.1 2 1 2 2.96
Brad Brach 26 24.2 3 1 0 5.11
2019 Orioles 62 548.1 19 43 12 5.68

 

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca