Stat-urday, 10/6/2018


Following up on Wednesday’s post on the worst Orioles team in history, below is a chart of the 25 worst MLB teams of all time. I guess its comforting to know that the 2018 Orioles are only #15 on the all-time worst list.

Rank Season Franchise League Wins Losses Pct. GB
1 1916 Philadelphia Athletics AL 36 117 0.235 54½
2 1935 Boston Braves NL 38 115 0.248 61½
3 1962 New York Mets NL 40 120 0.250 60½
4 1904 Washington Senators AL 38 113 0.252 55½
5 1919 Philadelphia Athletics AL 36 104 0.257 52
6 2003 Detroit Tigers AL 43 119 0.265 47
7 1952 Pittsburgh Pirates NL 42 112 0.273 54½
8 1909 Washington Senators AL 42 110 0.276 56
9 1942 Philadelphia Phillies NL 42 109 0.278 62½
10 1939 St. Louis Browns AL 43 111 0.279 64½
11 1932 Boston Red Sox AL 43 111 0.279 64
12 1941 Philadelphia Phillies NL 43 111 0.279 57
13 1915 Philadelphia Athletics AL 43 109 0.283 58½
14 1928 Philadelphia Phillies NL 43 109 0.283 51
15 2018 Baltimore Orioles AL 47 115 0.290 61
16 1911 Boston Rustlers NL 44 107 0.291 54
17 1909 Boston Doves NL 45 108 0.294 65½
18 1911 St. Louis Browns AL 45 107 0.296 56½
19 1939 Philadelphia Phillies NL 45 106 0.298 50½
20 1937 St. Louis Browns AL 46 108 0.299 56
21 1945 Philadelphia Phillies NL 46 108 0.299 52
22 1938 Philadelphia Phillies NL 45 105 0.300 43
23 2004 Arizona Diamondbacks NL 51 111 0.315 42
24 2013 Houston Astros AL 55 111 0.315 45
25 1988 Baltimore Orioles AL 54 107 0.335 34.5

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

Advertisements

The Worst Orioles Team in History


Memorial_Stadium_(Baltimore)
Memorial Stadium, home of the 1986 Baltimore Orioles (photo courtesy of Wikipedia)

When looking up “This Date in Baseball History,” I saw the following entry for October 3: “1986 – Baltimore loses to Detroit 6-3, assuring the Orioles of their first last-place finish since moving from St. Louis in 1954.”

That got me wondering, how many last-place finishes have we had since moving from St. Louis? Further, how bad (or good) have the Orioles actually been throughout their history – particularly in light of this past horrific season?

For starters, the 2018 season was the absolute worst season the Orioles have ever had in their 65 years in Baltimore: the O’s won only 47 games and lost 115 (a win percentage of .290). The 1986 team — the historic first last-place season team since moving to Baltimore — was far better, winning 73 games and losing 89. In fact, in the franchise’s entire history, only the 1939 St. Louis Browns have a worse record with a .279 win percentage. Nonetheless, this year the Orioles still managed to lose more games than the 1939 Browns (the Browns lost 43 and won 111 in 1939; the 2018 winning percentage is higher only because they played fewer games in 1939).

The 2018 Orioles finished 61 games out of first place. Only the 1954 Orioles come anywhere close to that, finishing 57 games out. The St. Louis Browns finished more than 50 games out of first place four times (in 1910, 1911, 1927, and 1939). Again, only the 1939 Browns finished even worse than the 2018 Orioles, finishing their season 64.5 games out of first place.

638px-Oriole_Adam_Jones
Adam Jones, 2011 (photo by Keith Alison, via Wikipedia)

If it’s any consolation, when you look at the decade-by-decade breakdown (see table below), the Orioles were actually worse from 2000 to 2009, when they won only 698 games. With one year left to go in this decade, we’ve already improved upon that record. (Sure, a decade is an artificial breakdown, especially when comparing team performance, but at least it gives us a sense of how we are trending.)

Of course, worse than the number of games lost or the number of games we ended up out of first place is the number of favorite players traded and the number of favorite players likely to not be offered new contracts this off season.

~ baseballrebecca

 

 

Baltimore Orioles Record: 1954-2018

Decade Wins Losses Win Percent No. of Times in 1st Place* No. of Times in Last Place
2010-2018 701 757 0.481 1 4
2000s 698 920 0.431 0 2
1990s 794 757 0.512 1 0
1980s 800 761 0.512 1 2
1970s 944 656 0.590 5 0
1960s 911 698 0.566 2 0
1954-1959 404 517 0.439 0 0

*Refers to place in the division after 1969; divisions were created in 1969.

 

 

Stat-urday, 9/1/2018


It’s been a rough season, and now we’re headed into the final stretch. Here are some stats to prove just how bad it’s been:

Orioles record: 40-95

Nationals record: 67-68

Baysox record: 66-69

Number of my favorite players traded: 3

Stat-urday, 8/25/2018


Cal_Ripken,_Jr_honored_at_Camden_Yards_2007
Cal Ripken in 2007, photo by Keith Allison via Wikipedia

Cal Ripken, Jr., turned 58 yesterday. In his 21 years as an Oriole, Cal amassed a lot of games, hits, and runs. Here are just a few of his MLB stats:

  • Number of teams played for: 1
  • Consecutive games played: 2,632
  • Total games played: 3,001
  • At bats: 11,551
  • Hits: 3,184
  • Doubles: 603
  • Triples: 44
  • Home runs: 431
  • Walks: 1,129
  • Intentional walks: 107
  • RBIs: 1,695
  • Double plays: 1,682
  • Stolen bases: 36
  • Strikeouts: 70
  • Caught stealing: 39
  • All-star games: 19 (every year, 1983 to 2001)
  • All-star game MVP awards: 2
  • American League MVP awards: 2
  • Silver Slugger awards: 8
  • Lifetime batting average: .276

Cal also spent four years in the minor leagues playing for the Bluefield Orioles (1978), the Miami Orioles (1979), the Charlotte Orioles (1979-80), and the Rochester Red Wings (1981). He played 443 games as a minor leaguer, with 1,652 at bats, 463 hits, and 56 home runs. His batting average in the minors was .280.

Happy Birthday, Cal!

~ baseballrebecca

Stat-urday, 8/11/2018


An interesting stat posted earlier this week by MLB Network:

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca 

Stat-urday, 8/4/2018


CbhLwDZWwAALH2jI found a cool stats tool the other day when doing research on Manny Machado and Jonathan Schoop. You can get game by game stats on ESPN.com. On the left side pull down menu, click on MLB and at the top click More and then select Players. From there you can search by player or team. For each player, you can see a variety of stats, including the “Game Log,” which gives you daily stats. There are so many fun things we can analyze with this!

This will be a longer term project, but I’d love to figure out how well Manny and Jonathan did in games there played together versus games where they did not play together. For example, as a Dodger, Manny has been batting .268 with 2 home runs and 5 RBI (in 14 games through Thursday). Prior to being traded, his batting average was .315 and he had 24 home runs and 65 RBI (in 96 games). Jonathan was batting .244 with 17 home runs and 40 RBI in 85 games as an Oriole. In his first two games with Milwaukee he went 0-for-8.

This may not be a sufficiently large sample size, but, so far, they were better together, than apart.

~ baseballrebecca

#bringbackthebromance