Stat-urday, 7/20/2019: Gaylord Perry’s “Moon Shot”


File:Gaylord Perry 1961.jpg

Gaylord Perry with the Tacoma Giants in 1961 (photo courtesy of Wikipedia)

On July 20, 1969, pitcher Gaylord Perry hit is his first major league home run. In his 22-year career Perry would amass a batting average of .131 with 141 hits, including 17 doubles, 6 home runs, and 47 RBI. As a Hall of Fame pitcher, however, he’d finish his career with a 3.11 ERA, allowing 399 home runs with a win-loss percentage of .542.

One of the myth’s surrounding Perry is the tale that his manager with the Giants once said, “a man will land on the moon before Gaylord Perry hits a home run.” According to MLB.com’s Cut 4, the story goes as follows:

One day during the ’64 season, [San Francisco Giants Manager Alvin] Dark and San Francisco Examiner reporter Harry Jupiter looked on as Perry smacked some home runs during batting practice. Jupiter told Dark that Perry looked pretty good with a bat in his hands and remarked that the pitcher might even hit a home run one of these days. Dark’s response set in motion one of the weirdest coincidences in baseball history: “Mark my words,” he said, “a man will land on the moon before Gaylord Perry hits a home run.”

And if you don’t believe that, here’s Perry telling the story himself:

 

Happy Stat-urday! Happy Moon Landing Day!

~ baseballrebecca

 

 

 

Advertisements

Stat-urday, 7/6/2019


There was an amazing game with some amazing stats on Wednesday from just one game in the Dominican Summer League:

  • 40 runs,
  • 36 hits,
  • 5 home runs,
  • 6 errors,
  • 3 stolen bases,
  • 5 wild pitches,
  • 2 balks,
  • 33 players used, and
  • 215 pitches thrown.
  • All in 3hours and 42 minutes!

Check out the details on MiLB.com!

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

Stat-urday, 6/29/2019


Scooter Gennett on May 12 2017.jpg

Scooter Gennett with the Cincinnati Reds in 2017 (photo courtesy of Wikipedia)

I stumbled upon some interesting stats on Baseball-Reference.com: Players’ average age, by league. They’ve calculated the leagues’ average player age, weighted by number of at-bats and games played. At first I was surprised to see that the league with the highest average batters’ average age is the Class A-Advanced Florida State League, with an average batters’ age of 31.1. Upon further research however, its rehabbing Major Leaguers that  driving up that average age, such as: Scooter Gennett, age 29, with the Daytona Tortugas; Josh Harrison, 31, and Jordy Mercer, 32, with the Lakeland Flying Tigers; Nelson Cruz, 38, with the Fort Myers Miracle; and a bunch of rehabbing Yankees with the Tampa Tarpons. Check out the stats below.

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

 

Major League Baseball and Minor League Baseball
League Level Teams Batters’ Avg. Age Batting Average
American League Major League 15 28.0 0.251
National League Major League 15 28.4 0.250
International League AAA 14 27.1 0.265
Mexican League AAA 16 29.5 0.304
Pacific Coast League AAA 16 26.3 0.273
Eastern League AA 12 24.2 0.237
Southern League AA 10 23.7 0.241
Texas League AA 8 29.2 0.254
California League Adv A 8 22.5 0.245
Carolina League Adv A 10 22.6 0.244
Florida State League Adv A 12 31.1 0.241
Midwest League A 16 21.2 0.239
South Atlantic League A 14 21.5 0.238
New York-Pennsylvania League Short-Season A 14 20.9 0.224
Northwest League Short-Season A 8 20.8 0.228
Appalachian League Rookie 10 20.4 0.238
Arizona League Rookie 21 19.6 0.269
Gulf Coast League Rookie 18 19.4 0.237
Pioneer League Rookie 8 20.5 0.255
Japanese and Korean Leagues
League Level Teams Batters’ Avg. Age BA
Japan Central League Foreign 6 28.6 0.250
Japan Eastern League Foreign 7 24.3
Japan Pacific League Foreign 6 28.0 0.250
Japan Western League Foreign 5 24.6
Korean Baseball Organization Foreign 10 29.0 0.268
Independent Leagues
League Level Teams Batters’ Avg. Age BA
American Association Independent 12 26.7 0.262
Atlantic League Independent 8 29.6 0.262
Canadian-American Association Independent 9 26.1 0.266
Frontier League Independent 10 24.2 0.244

Stat-urday, 6/22/2019


Corey Paul turned 50 yesterday. Who’s that, you ask? Corey Paul was drafted by the Seattle Mariners in the 16th round of the 1987 MLB amateur draft. He spent the 1987 season in Northwest League playing for the Bellingham Mariners. In 33 games, he had only 13 hits and 7 RBI, with a batting average of .137. Paul took the next year off, but returned to Bellingham in 1989. That year he improved his batting average to .237, hitting 3 home runs and 25 RBI in 59 games. In 1990, he was promoted to the high-A Salinas Spurs in the California League, where he batted .226 in 80 games with 28 RBI and 4 home runs.

Although Paul did not return to the Mariners’ system after the 1990 season, he did resurface a few years later in the independent Western League, playing for teams in California and Washington between 1995 and 1998. In 1999, Paul started the season in Taiwan before moving to Tokorozawa, Japan, to play for the Seibu Lions of the Japan Pacific League. He then spent the 2002 season in Korea with the Hyundai Unicorns. Paul returned to North America in 2003, playing for first for Saltillo, then for Tabasco. He also played winter ball for the Algonoderos de Guasave in the Mexican Pacific League and the Oriente Caribbeans in the Venezuela Winter League. In 2004, Paul was again the United States, playing in the independent Northern League with Fargo-Moorhead and Joliet. He played for Calgary in the same league in 2005. Check out his stats below.

During his professional baseball career, Paul played for teams in Mexico, Venezuela, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, Canada, and the United States. I wonder what the stats are for the most countries a player has played in?

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

Year Team League G H HR RBI BA OBP
1987 Bellingham Mariners Northwest League 33 13 0 7 0.137 0.281
1989 Bellingham Mariners Northwest League 59 47 3 25 0.237 0.367
1990 Salinas Spurs California League 89 52 4 28 0.226 0.35
1995 Grays Harbor Gulls Western League 74 76 9 36 0.297 0.399
1996 Tri-City Posse Western League 81 87 5 43 0.326 0.395
1997 Chico Heat Western League 53 64 6 41 0.348 0.496
1998 Tri-City Posse Western League 88 90 13 58 0.296 0.433
1999 Taipei Suns Taiwan Major League 39 0.360
1999 Seibu Lions Japan Pacific League 59 47 12 29 0.257 0.318
2000 Seibu Lions Japan Pacific League 47 30 4 18 0.242 0.333
2002 Hyundai Unicorns Korean Baseball Organization 113 111 18 64 0.28 0.345
2003 Saltillo Saraperos Mexican League 66 83 9 45 0.356 0.446
2003 Tabasco Olmecas Mexican League 28 25 2 8 0.258 0.405
2004 Fargo-Moorhead Redhawks Northern League 11 9 1 7 0.25 0.372
2004 Joliet Jackhammers Northern League 84 92 10 45 0.298 0.407
2005 Calgary Vipers Northern League 29 27 3 15 0.265 0.394
Career Totals: 914 853 99 469 0.283 0.389

Stat-urday, 6/8/2019


In my continuing annoyance with the Baltimore Orioles this season, I am keeping track of all of my favorite former Orioles (and a few others) to see how they’re doing on other and better teams. As expected, Adam Jones and Nick Markakis are still awesome!

Here are the latest stats:

Former Oriole Games AB Avg OBP RBI HR
Adam Jones 59 228 .276 .321 37 12
Christian Walker 58 213 .258 .328 24 11
Tim Beckham 53 187 .241 .290 33 11
Nick Markakis 60 207 .271 .362 28 4
Manny Machado 60 219 .247 .337 31 10
Jonathan Schoop 53 195 .262 .318 31 11
Caleb Joseph* 9 17 .176 .176 2 0
Nelson Cruz 37 134 .261 .342 23 8
2019 Orioles 62 2120 .239 .300 238 79

* Optioned to the Reno Aces on 5/2/2019

 

Former Oriole Games IP W L SV ERA
Kevin Gausman 12 60.0 2 5 0 6.15
Zack Britton 28 27.1 2 1 2 2.96
Brad Brach 26 24.2 3 1 0 5.11
2019 Orioles 62 548.1 19 43 12 5.68

 

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

 

 

 

 

 

Stat-urday, 6/1/2019


In anticipation of the MLB draft, which will be held this week, June 3-5, I’m posting Baseball America’s tweet showing the percentage of draftees that actually make it to the majors. Pretty interesting stats!

 

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

 

Stat-urday, 5/18/2019


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d2/Dodger_Stadium_field_from_upper_deck_2015-10-04.jpgAfter two rain outs in a row in New York this week, I started wondering how the weather has affected games and attendance this year, and stumbled upon an interesting article about MLB attendance being down for the sixth straight year. Last year, they tried to blame it on the weather, but that doesn’t seem to be the case this year.

Below are the stats for this year’s attendance so far, courtesy of Baseball-reference.com. A whopping 18 teams have lower attendance this year than for the same time last year.

What do you think is causing the drop in attendance and what should MLB do about it?

Average Attendance per Game
Miami 9,516
Tampa Bay 14,540
Baltimore 14,972
Cleveland 15,285
Kansas City 15,525
Pittsburgh 15,717
Detroit 16,359
Cincinnati 17,124
Chicago White Sox 17,362
Minnesota 19,151
Oakland 19,541
Toronto 19,841
Seattle 23,066
Arizona 26,560
Washington 26,908
Texas 27,698
New York Mets 28,219
Atlanta 29,457
San Diego 30,454
Houston 31,941
San Francisco 32,669
Colorado 32,919
Milwaukee 33,079
Boston 33,902
Los Angeles Angels 34,866
Chicago Cubs 35,998
Philadelphia 36,130
New York Yankees 39,316
St. Louis 41,449
Los Angeles Dodgers 47,346

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca