Stat-urday, 5/19/2018


Brooks_Robinson_1955In honor of Brooks Robinson‘s birthday yesterday, here are a few stats and facts about Baltimore’s “Human Vacuum Cleaner:”

  • Robinson spent 23 years in the Major Leagues – all with the Baltimore Orioles!
  • Games played: 2,896
  • Hits: 2,848
  • Home runs: 268
  • Batting average: .267

Robinson was an 18-time All-Star, 16-time Gold Glove winner, AL MVP in 1964, World Series MVP in 1970, and Robert Clemente Award winner in 1972. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1983.

For more stats, check out his Baseball Reference page.

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

 

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Stat-urday, 5/12/2018


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Mitchellville Tigers, ca. 1948 (photo courtesy of Prince George’s County, MD)

On April 14, 2009, then-Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley signed a bill into law declaring the second Saturday in May to be Negro League Baseball Day. So, in honor of the day, here are some stats on the Negro Leagues in Maryland:

  • Four Negro League teams played in Maryland: (1) Baltimore Lord Baltimores, National Colored Baseball League, 1887; (2) Baltimore Black Sox, 1922-1934 (independent league, 1916-22 and 1930-31; Eastern Colored League, 1923-28; American Negro League, 1929; East-West League, 1932; Negro National League, 1933-34); (3) Baltimore Stars (independent league, 1933); and (4) Baltimore Elite Giants (Negro National League, 1938-48; Negro American League, 1949-50). In addition, several semi-pro and sandlot teams played throughout the state, such as the Mitchellville Tigers  and the Galesville Hot Sox.
  • At least 10 members of the Baltimore Black Sox were born in Maryland: Blainey Hall, Buddy Burbage, George Grayer, John Stanley, Malcolm Brown, Peter Johnson, Scrappy Brown, Stuart Jones, Tony Mahoney, and Wyman Smith.
  • The Black Sox and the Elite Giants each won two championships: 1929 and 1932 for the Black Sox and 1939 and 1949 for the Elite Giants.

Satchel_Paige_1949_BowmanTwo of the most famous Negro League players in Baltimore were Satchel Paige and Leon Day. Paige, a right-handed pitcher, had an win-loss record of 100-50 in the Negro Leagues, and 28-31 in the Major Leagues. Day, also a RHP, had a 64-29 win-loss record of 64-29 in the Negro Leagues, with an ERA of 2.98.

Happy Negro League Baseball Day!

~ baseballrebecca

 

 

Stat-urday, 5/5/2018


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Jeong Choi in 2013 (photo courtesy of Wikipedia)

As of May 1, who had hit the most home runs? Not Didi Gregorius, Mitch Haniger, or Mike Trout, all of whom had 10 home runs each. It was in fact Jeong Choi with 14 home runs. Jeong Choi is a third baseman with the SK Wyverns Baseball Club of the Korean League. In both 2016 and 2017, Choi lead the league in home runs, hitting 40 and 46, respectively. I can’t wait to see how many he hits this year.

Want more Korean baseball statistics? Check out the KBO’s stats page.

~ baseballrebecca

 

Stat-urday, 4/28/2018


In his seven years in the Major Leagues, Tony Solaita hit 50 home runs and amassed a career batting average of .255. Interestingly, in just four years in Japan, Solaita hit 155 home runs with a .268 batting average. In comparison, he hit 167 home runs with a batting average of .266 in nine years in the minors (all levels). Forty-nine of his minor league home runs came during the 1968 season, likely resulting in his brief 1968 call-up in September that year. Check out his career stats below, courtesy of Baseball Reference.

Happy Stat-urday!

~ baseballrebecca

Year Parent Club League/ Level G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BA
1965 Yankees Rookie 45 110 12 28 4 0 1 14 0.255
1966 Yankees Rookie, A 93 277 38 73 13 1 4 60 0.264
1967 Yankees A 128 400 53 97 9 4 14 64 0.243
1968 Yankees A Rookie 138 467 106 141 20 3 49 122 0.302
1968 Yankees MLB 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.000
1969 White Sox/ Yankees AA, AAA 110 321 50 78 9 4 23 62 0.243
1970 Yankees AAA 130 396 62 122 24 2 19 87 0.308
1971 Yankees AAA 117 349 72 82 15 2 19 54 0.235
1972 Yankees AA,AAA 125 381 61 88 13 2 15 60 0.231
1973 Pirates AAA 132 438 71 126 18 2 23 74 0.288
1974 Royals MLB 96 239 31 64 12 0 7 30 0.268
1975 Royals MLB 93 231 35 60 11 0 16 44 0.260
1976 Royals/ Angels MLB 94 283 29 74 13 0 9 42 0.261
1977 Angels MLB 116 324 40 78 15 0 14 53 0.241
1978 Angels MLB 60 94 10 21 3 0 1 14 0.223
1979 Expos/Blue Jays MLB 65 144 19 39 12 1 3 20 0.271
1980 Nippon Ham Fighters Japanese 125 447 62 107 9 0 45 95 0.239
1981 Nippon Ham Fighters Japanese 128 454 86 136 23 1 44 108 0.300
1982 Nippon Ham Fighters Japanese 130 449 65 126 22 1 30 84 0.281
1983 Nippon Ham Fighters Japanese 127 436 64 110 16 1 36 84 0.252
MLB Stats (7 Years) 525 1316 164 336 66 1 50 203 0.255

 

Stat-urday, 4/21/2018


Yesterday I wondered how much the weather has really impacted attendance this season. Aside from postponing games, Mother Nature may be only partly be the cause of declines in attendance, which is about 10 percent less than last year. So, what has attendance been this year? ESPN.com reports the following attendance numbers:

2017 Rank  Team  2017 Attendance (full season)  2018 Attendance (as of 4/19/18)
1 LA Dodgers 46,492 46,793
2 St. Louis 42,567 39,052
3 San Francisco 40,785 39,724
4 NY Yankees 39,835 36,589
5 Toronto 39,554 27,490
6 Chicago Cubs 39,500 34,559
7 LA Angels 37,278 38,943
8 Colorado 36,464 32,392
9 Boston 36,020 33,301
10 Milwaukee 31,589 33,287
11 Washington 31,172 26,707
12 Texas 30,960 27,695
13 Atlanta 30,929 28,070
14 NY Mets 30,757 28,735
15 Houston 29,674 37,289
16 Detroit 28,661 19,805
17 Kansas City 27,754 17,646
18 San Diego 26,401 27,631
19 Seattle 26,363 25,636
20 Arizona 26,350 27,211
21 Minnesota 25,640 19,827
22 Cleveland 25,285 16,951
23 Baltimore 25,042 17,899
24 Philadelphia 24,118 28,432
25 Pittsburgh 23,696 13,733
26 Cincinnati 22,677 20,749
27 Chicago White Sox 20,626 15,325
28 Miami 20,395 13,171
29 Oakland 18,446 17,138
30 Tampa Bay 15,670 16,347

Stat-urday, 4/7/2018


FSU's_baseball_team_celebrates_their_victory-_Tallahassee,_Florida_(7115463979)
Florida State University baseball teams celebrates in 1991, photo courtesy of the State Library and Archives of Florida via Flickr

A few weeks ago looked at the high schools and colleges attended by professional baseball players. But what are the odds of moving from high school to college to MLB? Fortunately, the NCAA provides those stats for us. Of the approximately 490,000 high school baseball players in the United States, about 7.1% end up playing in college, 2.1% go to Division I schools.

Of the 34,544 college baseball players in 2016, 7,679 were draft eligible, 1,206 were draft picks, and 695 were drafted by MLB. Thus, 9.1% of college baseball players ultimately ended up in professional baseball.

Stated another way, the odds of a high school baseball player making it to the Major Leagues is about 764 to 1.

~ baseballrebecca

 

Stat-urday, 3/10/2018


IMG_3179
North Pole High School

Last week we looked at the stats for Major Leaguers who went to college. This week, we turn our attention to high school baseball. Baseball Reference has a state-by-state  list of high schools with which you can find a high school and see who went there. You can also look at each school’s rankings and determine the school with the highest number of players or even Hall of Famers. For example, who attended North Pole High School in Alaska and went on to play professional baseball? (Hint: its not Santa Claus.) Christopher Aure went to NPHS and was drafted by the Pirates in 2008. He spent two seasons playing of the Gulf Coast League Pirates. LHP Aure had a 3-2 record with a 3.90 ERA in 2008 and went 0-0 in 3 games in 2009 with a 1.69 ERA.

 

So, who went to your high school?

~ baseballrebecca